René Wagner

René Wagner

 

Microservices: The Architecture that Runs the Cloud

 

In past decades, software applications for organizations and enterprises were built as single systems designed to fulfill multiple business needs. These applications are often referred to as monolithic due to their enormous size and cumbersome nature. In a monolithic structure, all functionalities rely upon one another, making them very difficult to update or maintain—making changes in one area can create unknown failures in others. Additionally, maintenance and upgrades can be a very heavy burden not just for the system administrators, but for the business as a whole. Entire areas within the organization are often offline for hours or even days as administrators hold their breath to make sure the new/upgraded applications don’t break something else.

networkOne of the most important architectural advances since the rise of cloud computing is microservices. Though not necessarily tiny in size, microservices offer an alternative by breaking down monolithic applications into multiple, single-purpose services that interoperate with—rather than depend on—each other. These decoupled services are highly flexible, scalable, reliable, and can run simultaneously across multiple applications.

Microservices also make processes more efficient. They have the ability to communicate with one another to make a complete system and enable teams to use agile software development practices to deliver constant, ongoing software releases rather than forcing administrators to rely on single time-intensive upgrades.

From a business perspective, microservices can fulfill customer and employee requirements on an as-needed basis to provide new services and functionality. Their efficiency often means faster time to market on new products and services, and since they can be developed independently, organizations experience reduced risk with minimal business disruption.
 

Preparing to Move to a Microservices Environment

 

When considering modernizing monolithic applications and making the move to a cloud-based microservice architecture, you must first assess, tune, and optimize your applications for a successful  effort. Consider these items when preparing for a modernization of your legacy mainframe systems to bring them up to par with today’s architectures and languages:

  • Know your systems.
  • In order to successfully modernize, understanding your existing systems is key. Obtain documentation and a detailed blueprint of your current architecture.
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  • Assess the appropriate target language.
  • Microservices can be written in many different modern computing languages. Your business and operational needs can help drive this decision.
     
  • Understand your data model.
    How will your data interact with the microservices you build or employ, and how do you ensure that you do the appropriate due diligence to protect your own data as well as your customers’?
     
  • Decide on cloud vs. on-premises (private cloud) deployment.
    While cloud infrastructure becomes more secure by the day, if your systems are highly classified or include sensitive personal information, you may want to modernize to a private cloud that still allows you to employ microservices.
     
  • Additional considerations – automation and refactoring.

While there are many different approaches to software modernization, the most accurate, efficient, and cost-effective option is a fully automated solution. Automation provides significant advantages over manual enhancements, not the least of which is a huge reduction in risk due to the introduction of human error to the modernized application.

A fully automated modernization includes a key component known as architectural refactoring. With refactoring, the application is re-engineered to improve the modernized system’s architecture, user interface, and maintainability. This iterative process also includes the removal of dead and redundant code while improving the quality and effectiveness through each pass. The refactoring process retains the functional equivalency of the original application while making the system more flexible, microservice compatible, and ready for cloud deployment.
 

Getting Across the Finish Line to Microservices and the Cloud

 

Modernizing your monolithic applications to microservices and the cloud is no easy feat. It will take a team of experts to not only focus on the tactical modernization of the software, but also work closely with you to put your organization on the path to success. This means working to understand your existing architecture with an assessment and documentation, developing a roadmap to your target language and architecture, and finally, getting you across the finish line with a fully modernized and improved application that’s ready for microservices and the cloud. This start-to-finish partner will be an invaluable ally in your efforts.

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TSRI is Here for You

As a leading provider of software modernization services, TSRI enables technology readiness for the cloud and other modern architecture environments. We bring software applications into the future quickly, accurately, and efficiently with low risk and minimal business disruption, accomplishing in months what would otherwise take years.

Get started on your modernization journey today!

At AWS re:Invent 2020, Amazon Web Services (AWS) unveiled plans for a new “Mainframe Migration Competency” and announced that TSRI has been identified as a launch partner! AWS recognized that TSRI’s solution — which provides near-100% automation and cloud-specific refactoring — are a huge benefit for organizations seeking reliable, low-risk, and rapid migration to the cloud. Furthermore, TSRI’s proven track record, which includes hundreds of successful modernization projects over more than 25 years, meant that TSRI would be a reliable and knowledgeable technology partner for AWS customers.

 

AWS and TSRIFrom AWS:

“Recognizing the complexity of a mainframe migration, our customers seek proven methodologies, tools, and best practices to empower successful migrations. The AWS Partner Network (APN) plays a critical role in these efforts by providing proven technology products and services for customers’ mainframe migrations.”

 

TSRI’s model-based solution transforms even very large (tens of millions of lines of code) legacy systems written in languages like COBOL, Fortran, PowerBuilder, Ada, MUMPS, VB6, and more than 30 other languages, into modern applications in cloud-native target architectures. The output is a modern multi-tier application that takes advantage of cloud utilities and scalability.

Now is the time to modernize for the cloud. According to AWS, “more than 70 percent of the Fortune 500 companies still run business-critical applications on mainframes, and many companies and institutions still possess legacy mainframes in their data centers. As a result of constantly evolving customer needs, the demand for modernization has accelerated as companies require increased agility to meet those needs.

“Due to the slow development cycle of mainframes, more companies are migrating to the cloud to enable rapid development and innovation. Furthermore, as mainframe subject matter experts retire and leave the workforce, these companies face an increasing skills gap.

“Coupled with high upgrade and development costs and expensive usage fees, CIOs with mainframes they must maintain are well aware of the business risks to their enterprise. As a result, a growing number of companies are looking to modernize and migrate their mainframe workloads to Amazon Web Services. These migrations enable companies to realize business benefits like an average 70 percent savings in IT infrastructure costs.”

See the AWS blog for more.

We’re excited to start the modernization journey with any organization looking to get off their mainframe and on to AWS! Learn more about how TSRI can help you transform your technology quickly and seamlessly, ensuring you and your application users can make the most of what cloud technologies have to offer.

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TSRI is Here for You

As a leading provider of software modernization services, TSRI enables technology readiness for the cloud and other modern architecture environments. We bring software applications into the future quickly, accurately, and efficiently with low risk and minimal business disruption, accomplishing in months what would otherwise take years.

See Case Studies

Learn About Our Technology

Get started on your modernization journey today!

 

Perhaps you’ve seen your competition pull ahead. Maybe your customers have become frustrated with their experience as they interact with your systems. Possibly, you’ve even experienced a security breach. You know your legacy systems need to move into the 21st century, and perhaps you’re struggling to decide how to move forward. Whether you want to face it or not, now is the time to take a hard look at modernizing your digital infrastructure.

According to salesforce.com, “while there may be a multitude of reasons for a business to undergo digital transformation, it mostly boils down to survival. Digital transformation can be risky and expensive, so it’s often a necessity for businesses that want to survive and outlast the ones that failed to evolve.”

And then there’s the expense: Daniel Newman at The Future of Work suggests that as much as 80 percent of an IT budget can be spent on maintenance. Modernizing legacy systems—even incrementally—can help a company see its capabilities leap forward by using the cloud to integrate automation into standard business processes. John Brandon at techradar.com suggests that “some of the most disruptive technologies—such as machine learning, voice bots like Amazon Alexa, and artificial intelligence—are helping to automate mundane tasks and improve how a business runs.”

These technologies run on data. In this new era of computing, the businesses that truly succeed will be the ones that put an emphasis on their data. If they haven’t already, legacy systems with limitations on their data will fall behind, especially when introducing machine learning and AI into the mix. At the same time, the data and infrastructure that have kept older systems going for so long can’t just be switched off, and freezing the systems as teams write and develop its replacement will push customers away.

Modernization effectively overcomes these risks to your organization by opening up the possibilities that an older codebase wasn't designed to handle.

“Taking inventory of what still works and what doesn’t allows companies to identify which processes are no longer relevant,” writes Newman. “Only applications deemed critical to business are then modernized; the others are simply retired, saving time and money on maintenance.”

When you decide to replace or reconfigure your legacy system, you can decide between any of these modernization options:

New Application Development. Replicate your legacy system by writing entirely new code. Your team will manually develop your new system using current coding practices with modern interfaces, and support for current technologies. This option is very expensive option, and it’s generally only usable to set a baseline for future development. You’ll incur expenses that can be as high as the original project, risk levels are similar to a typical “waterfall” project, and there are high likelihoods of time and budget overruns.

Extend/Surround. Many organizations currently opt for this method. The development teams or consultants encapsulate the legacy system in coding containers that provide APIs and tack-on integration with other systems. While the solution may work, you will have a patchwork of code, often in multiple programming languages, that gradually increases technical debt and incurs added maintenance costs. While this situation defers replacement, it will likely be costly in the long run.

COTS/SaaS. Both common off-the-shelf (COTS) solutions or cloud-based SaaS systems enable you to migrate to a less expensive and more modern architecture, but costs can easily escalate. The new system will require customization and ongoing licensing costs. Such a migration could create ripple effects on other systems and cause you to incur other costs from conforming to a completely new platform with unknown attributes.

Automated Modernization. A careful translation of code by a team of expert external engineers creates a new, modern application based upon the logic and behavior of the original. The process will include varying degrees of automation, which increases accuracy while decreasing costs. Modernization will likely incur the least risk and expense of any of these options.

Replacement of aging systems is becoming increasingly urgent, and as programmers of many of these older systems retire, replacement costs will continue to rise. An automated modernization program will likely yield the least expensive and most flexible alternative for stable, long-term performance.

 

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TSRI is Here for You

As a leading provider of software modernization services, TSRI enables technology readiness for the cloud and other modern architecture environments. We bring software applications into the future quickly, accurately, and efficiently with low risk and minimal business disruption, accomplishing in months what would otherwise take years.

See Case Studies

Learn About Our Technology

Get started on your modernization journey today!

Standish Group, “Modernization: Clearing a Pathway to Success,” 2010

New tagline: Software Modernization Assured

New mission statement: Through technical ingenuity, dedication, and collaboration, we automate the modernization of high-value software, advancing organizations into a better business and technology reality.

New vision statement:  Creating a world where organizations aren’t limited by technology.

As we mark our 25th anniversary, the TSRI you see today is a fresh, renewed TSRI. As we embarked upon the celebration of this milestone, we realized that our brand deserved to catch up to the advances the company has made in technology, delivery, and that we needed to better capture a track record of success and client-focus that our team is proud of. For a company that specializes in assuring software modernizations, it was time for form to reflect function.

TSRI’s mission has evolved. While we are known as a company that provides efficient and effective technology modernization, we needed to better communicate that our capabilities, while applicable to the modernization and refactoring of a broad array of legacy computer languages, are matched by our investment in the holistic guidance of our clients through their modernization journey and beyond.

We began with questions. Lots of questions. True to TSRI’s culture, we established our new brand as a team effort. We knew, all the way across the company, who we’ve been and how we show up for our clients: Precise. Dependable. Innovative. Collaborative. Experienced. Proven. But we also wanted our refreshed brand to take us forward. The logo, the colors, the design of our website, the printed materials we distribute… every place we make an impression we put on the table.

Understanding What Our Clients Value!

Our first step was to understand not only our unique brand personality and brand promise, but also to understand our clients. We undertook an exercise that forced us to dig deep—into the culture, how we feel we represent ourselves to our clients, and how we want to show the best of our expanded, collaborative end-to-end services. We explored multiple visualizations to convey the key pillars we knew would describe the evolution of TSRI.

Once we’d established our pillars, we explored what that personality would look like, starting with our new logo.

The Logo

TSRI logo

TSRI’s previous logo made a statement: the classic red-black target was intended to imply precision and accuracy, which we do in fact prioritize, in the outcomes of transformations. However, it also confused some people about the mission of our company. We still wanted to maintain that idea of precision while remaining close to our roots. The brand mark, or icon, that was developed, as well as the abstracted moving reticle on our homepage, tells that story. The circular arrows inside the reticle show the forward-moving, iterative processes that make our modernization and refactoring projects highly successful while invoking the limitless horizons a modern codebase can open for our clients. Our clients trust us to think outside of the box as we partner with them to modernize, and they can trust that we will stick around to keep modernizing and support them in the evolution of their systems.

The TSRI word mark itself evokes that feeling of openness while the connected ‘S’ and ‘R’ feels almost space age—definitely futuristic!

 

Our palette


The two shades of blue that anchor our logo are TSRI's new primary colors.

Brand blues

To us, the navy blue feels like professionalism, steadiness, and establishment. We paired that dark blue with a lighter sky blue to reflect the expansive ideas and experience our technical team and collaborators bring to each and every project.

brand grays

For our secondary colors, we landed on two lighter grays. These underscore the gravity of the systems we modernize. The soft black, clear and simple, represents accessibility to our clients.

Type

Brand typefaces

The typeface we chose to represent TSRI’s brand, Montserrat, is modern, refreshing, clean, inviting, and bold — we feel it represents our confidence in our own evolution and dedication to developing technologies and services in the service of our mission.

The Wider Angle

brand lines

Colors, type, and logos can show off the brand, but more subtle cues guide its implementation. These include the angled lines that show our innovation, our forward thinking, and how we move our clients into the future. We use photos with more of an abstract feel that tell the story of how our products provide precise results, which are inherently designed to help keep project risk at a minimum.

brand image settings

Pulling it All Together

All told, the process of reimagining the TSRI brand took just under three months. While we knew we would end up with a tone and voice that would tell the story of TSRI’s end-to-end capabilities, we were so gratified to have everyone aboard to guide us toward the bold, forward-thinking statement that sets us on the path of our next 25 years.

TSRI is a team that can move you forward, and we feel as though our visual brand now conveys that more accurately. We are dedicated to helping you carry your critical software applications into the future. We are “software modernization assured.”

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TSRI is Here for You

As a leading provider of software modernization services, TSRI enables technology readiness for the cloud and other modern architecture environments. We bring software applications into the future quickly, accurately, and efficiently with low risk and minimal business disruption, accomplishing in months what would otherwise take years.

See Case Studies

Learn About Our Technology

Get started on your modernization journey today!

Mainframes are big. Mainframes are powerful. Mainframes continue to run an enormous number of critical applications. Even as today’s enterprise infrastructures gravitate toward the cloud and newer languages, according to Allied Market Research, the market for mainframes will continue to grow through at least 2025 and legacy languages such as COBOL are still in wide use. The actual amount of processing performed by mainframes continues to grow steadily each year as a result of increasing demands, more users, and new applications reliant upon data stored on mainframes.

Modernize Now, Plan for the Future

While the capacity and processing power of a mainframe remains attractive to enterprise companies and governments alike, there are drawbacks: when it comes to agility, mainframes cannot quickly adjust to the needs of a business. They cannot quickly scale to meet extraordinary events. It’s difficult to integrate business-intelligence tools for non-engineers to easily access the data they need. Mainframes often don’t have the automated security tools to mitigate a security breach before it causes extensive damage.

At the same time, as each year passes, more experts that can maintain the older, legacy languages like COBOL and PL/1 are retiring. In the wake of the Covid-19 pandemic, the availability of programmers reached crisis proportions when overtaxed unemployment systems in some U.S. states couldn’t keep up with demand. Most younger software engineers train and work in newer, evolving languages that support web technologies and the cloud.

Still, even as many of these enterprise organizations are strongly considering moving operations and processes to the cloud, such migrations can take years, and they may not abandon their mainframes entirely. But they still need the agility, access, and security of a modern system to remain competitive.

So, what can these organizations do? They can modernize.

A modernization effort is often targeted not only at the mainframe itself, but at older language programs that run these massive machines. These programs, often written in now-archaic languages without consideration for internet connectivity or cloud computing, often need to change to meet the organization’s current needs for accessibility, customer experience, and security compliance. These requirements are universal to modernization efforts of any kind, but not all forms of modernization are adept at meeting all the requirements. The modernization strategy your organization selects needs to consider the resources you have available, your timelines, and what your ideal outcome looks like.

 

Choosing a Modernization Strategy

Mainframe modernization does not have to mean eliminating the mainframe. Organizations can utilize a number of different modernization strategies that meet different demands at varying cost and risk levels. Some possibilities include:

  1. Gradual integration: On an as-needed basis, organizations can use automation to modernize older applications through incremental improvement and build new applications on the mainframe that fit into a state-of-the-art computing environment.
  2. Retire, Retain, Replace, Rehost or Re-envision: An organization will assess legacy applications and systems on an individual basis and decide what should be retained, what can be rewritten, and what should be replaced with a new, modern application that can be hosted in a new environment such as the cloud.
  3. Lift and shift: Rebuild current mainframe applications on a new platform, then integrate the with mainframe applications and data sources across platforms.
  4. Automated Transformation: AAdedicated team assesses existing applications created in common languages such as COBOL or Fortran, or even less-common languages like PL/1 and MUMPS, then uses automated processes to translate the legacy application to the desired modern language (e.g., Java is a very common target). Organizations can then migrate to an upgraded mainframe or rehost them in the cloud. At the same time, a wider range of programmers can work with the modernized applications and more easily incorporate them into new databases and services.

Each approach varies depending upon business requirements, budget, and modernization schedule. Regardless, before beginning any process, an organization’s business and technical teams need to define their objectives and scope.

Gain Security & Competitive Advantage

Whether your organization is ready to move out of a mainframe environment or not, modernized code provides the security and peace of mind that your critical applications can be maintained and evolved as needed to support the business over time. As the Covid crisis and associated economic pressures have forced businesses of every size to accelerate modernizing their legacy systems, organization leaders have realized they can no longer wait to maintain their security and competitive advantage.

While some organizations may choose to do a wholesale migration, most companies and government agencies will opt to modernize using a more gradual approach. Either way – and whether an organization stays on their mainframe, moves to the cloud, or develops a hybrid solution – a modernization will ensure they can have the digital and human resources to sustain their operations far into the future.

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TSRI is Here for You

As a leading provider of software modernization services, TSRI enables technology readiness for the cloud and other modern architecture environments. We bring software applications into the future quickly, accurately, and efficiently with low risk and minimal business disruption, accomplishing in months what would otherwise take years.

See Case Studies

Learn About Our Technology

Get started on your modernization journey today!

Nearly everyone wants speed, efficiency, and accuracy—especially when it comes to software applications. As companies modernize their legacy codebases and migrate to the cloud, one of the best ways to achieve top performance is to create containers for modernized code.

Code modernization has become increasingly important as we move toward integrated cloud-based and virtualized software environments. While the original legacy code was written to meet the needs of the business at that moment time, modernization of code permits these legacy applications to meet the needs of today’s organization while retaining the integrity of the original business logic. Software developers can then focus on innovation rather than maintenance. Modernization makes it possible to meet the demands of today's infrastructure requirements without high cost or compromises in security or functionality. Companies looking to expand services, access improved processes, and use resources more efficiently will need architectural changes. Bringing these trends together, containerization under Docker and Kubernetes has created a new model for application deployment that provides numerous advantages to program operation and interoperability but requires special accommodation.

Containers provide consolidation benefits by permitting application instances to be stacked in larger virtual machines. Containerization improves efficiency, security, and reduces software licensing. It reduces complexity and ensures application portability, but the boost to protecting an organization’s systems at a time when only 56% of companies are integrating security into their technology strategies cannot be understated, according to Advanced’s 2020 Digital Business Report.

To take advantage of not just the security inherent to containerization, but the potential of having systems that can be ready for the next big advances in computing, applications must be modernized to externalize APIs and microservices. It is also important to ensure proper function within a containerized environment. Modernization transforms legacy applications to operate efficiently, reliably, and securely within the new environment with identical performance to the original application.

The Three-Step Approach: Transform, Cloud-Enable, Containerize & Deploy

When thinking about modernization, organizations can take a three-step approach based on TSRI’s experience in all forms of legacy code transformation, including migration to cloud services and containerization, to reduce risk and increase success:

1.         Migrate legacy monolithic code to a service-oriented environment. This includes updating language from COBOL to Java, JavaScript, or C#, changing databases, and enabling microservices. At this step of the process, the migration also begins to abstract underlying services from the application.

2.         Integrate service-oriented applications with native cloud services. This includes re-orienting code from WebSphere, DB2, or other legacy platforms to Apache Tomcat, Amazon RDS, or other modern platforms, for example. Upgrading to incorporate the latest native architectural interfaces ensures that applications will tightly integrate with the new environment, and ensures easier updates in future.

3.         Transform native cloud to Docker containers. The movement to containers provides additional architectural abstraction and improved integration of applications within the cloud.

As with any kind of migration and modernization, organizations need to assess, tune and optimize their applications for suitability and to ensure that applications will perform adequately within the container environment without infrastructure issues that might arise from coding anomalies.

The key to a successful migration is to evaluate and model the underlying legacy code logic and to pinpoint the areas that require adaptation to the new environment. Not every application has a natural and hazard-free path to a cloud-based containerized solution. Knowledge of container operations such as ephemeral storage and parallelization issues is extremely important in managing this transition. The transformed code must also be optimized to meet the needs of its new environment.

In the case of migrating and modernizing mainframe systems to the cloud, fully automated refactoring technologies such as TSRI’s JANUS Studio® toolset transform legacy applications to cloud-native applications for containerized deployment on multiple cloud providers, including a practice devoted specifically to AWS. TSRI’s model-based solution transforms even large legacy systems written in languages such as COBOL, Fortran, PowerBuilder, Ada, MUMPS, and VB6 into modern applications in cloud-native target architectures.

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TSRI is Here for You

As a leading provider of software modernization services, TSRI enables technology readiness for the cloud and other modern architecture environments. We bring software applications into the future quickly, accurately, and efficiently with low risk and minimal business disruption, accomplishing in months what would otherwise take years.

See Case Studies

Learn About Our Technology

Get started on your modernization journey today!

 

We are proud to announce that TSRI and its partner are currently underway on the first major mainframe modernization effort under the Modernizing Government Technology (MGT) Technology Modernization Fund, at HUD.

 

This effort was funded after the TSRI team participated in competitive prototyping event in 2016. This ongoing project involves the automated modernizations of approximately 800,000 lines of Unisys COBOL to Java including the underlying DMS-II database and the legacy user interfaces to a modern architecture/platform.

To learn more, please send us a message below.

Related articles:

https://tmf.cio.gov/projects/#unisys-mainframe-migration

https://washingtontechnology.com/articles/2018/03/01/salient-crgt-hud-contract.aspx

 

Don't miss a thing!

As we move into a new era of computing, it is becoming increasingly clear that legacy systems will need to be replaced. Challenges such as cloud computing, mobility, and the advancement of analytics require fundamental changes in architecture that are not easily supported without a major rewrite or modernization. Yet many of the systems that must be replaced are large, critical and complex and vital to the operation of the enterprise. Code that has been patched and re-patched, accumulating technical debt at every step along the way becomes extremely costly to maintain and makes eventual replacement increasingly daunting.

Eventually, however, replacement must be considered. With maintenance taking up 70 percent or more of IT budgets, there is no real choice. When you do elect to replace your legacy system, however, it is important that you select the right option. There are a number of possibilities that may be considered, each of which has variants, but your choice will affect the cost of your replacement effort, its ROI, and its overall likelihood of success.

Here, we will look at some basic possibilities, and examine their potential cost. They are:

New Application Development. This is the total rewrite option, creating a project to replicate the legacy system with entirely new code. It involves manual development to rationalize the system, use of current coding practices, creation of modern interfaces, and support for current technologies. This is the most expensive option, and is generally only usable as a baseline. The replacement is likely to be at least as expensive as the original project, with a similar risk level to a typical “waterfall” project, and a high likelihood of time and budget overruns.

Extend/Surround. This is the option currently used in many facilities. The legacy system is encapsulated in coding that provided APIs and tack-on integration with other systems. This creates a growing patchwork of code, often in diverse languages, that gradually increases technical debt and incurs added maintenance costs. It defers replacement, but it can be a costly solution in the long run.

COTS/SaaS. Moving to a Common Off-the-Shelf (COTS) solution, or migrating to a Cloud-based SaaS system provide possibilities of moving to a less expensive and more modern architecture, but costs can easily escalate. The new system will require customization, and will entail ongoing costs. There may be ripple effects on other systems, and other costs in conforming to a completely new platform with unknown attributes.

Modernization. Modernization involves careful translation of code to create a new, modern, application based upon the logic and behavior of the original. This may be accomplished with varying degrees of automation, and the result is likely to be the least expensive and least risky of the possibilities described here. Modernization is by far the least disruptive option because it both preserves existing capabilities as well as extends the life of the software assets in which enterprises have made enormous investments.

The Business Process Reengineering manifesto of the early 90’s that called upon enterprises to toss out legacy systems and start over with a “clean slate” in order to reinvent business processes proved disastrous for the many organizations who undertook reengineering projects injudiciously. A series of highly esteemed papers, now known as Lehman’s Laws of Software Evolution, published by Laszlo Belady and Manny Lehman in IEEE and ACM from 1975 through 1996 demonstrated that as legacy systems are continuously adapted to varying requirements and circumstances in their environment they accumulated technical debt over their lifespans due to degradation brought about by unmanaged change. Now canonical research by Martin Fowler, William Griswold and William Opdyke catalogued techniques for remedying many forms of technical debt by means of refactoring.

OMG Series publications by William Ulrich and Philip Newcomb demonstrated that architecture driven modernization that coupled model-based and rule-driven assessment, transformation and refactoring was capable of rapidly evolve and modernize mission-critical legacy systems with high levels of automation, precision and quality. By means of modernization many kinds of technical debt and software weaknesses that make legacy systems vulnerable to cyber threats can be remedied. Establishing a cost comparison for replacing, updating or modernizing legacy applications can be difficult due to the wide variety of situations in which upgrades may be considered. Nonetheless, benchmarks can be developed. A simplified comparison of the three possibilities is provided in Figure 1.


 

Choice of replacement strategy can affect the length of the project, risk, skills needed for the project and for continued operation, additional customization, technical debt accumulation, maintenance, initial replacement cost (capital budget) and ongoing expense of the system. These items all incur cost that needs to be considered in the system replacement business case.

Modernization tends to be significantly less costly than other options across a variety of indicators. This is borne out by reports such as The Standish Group’s Modernization study , which concluded that, while 52% of modernization projects showed a high ROI, only 34% of package application projects (COTS) did, and only 11% of new application projects did. Overall, modernization had the lowest cost with the highest return.

Looking further at modernization, a more automated approach is likely to be less expensive than a manual approach—particularly if automation is backed with expertise and based on a modeling system that reduces risk. TSRI has developed a unique and trusted approach to modernization. It uses a bullet-proof process and intermediary models to extract logic and make it available to other languages. Once logic has been extracted, transformation to new languages, refactoring, and code optimization ensure that the final system is modern and bug free, but performs without risk according to the same logic as the replaced application.

Replacement of aging systems is becoming increasingly urgent, and costs will rise as it is deferred. An automated modernization program is likely to yield the least expensive and most flexible alternative for stable, long-term performance.

For more information, please contact TSRI at +1 (425) 284-2770 or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

Tuesday, 15 September 2009 13:54

2000 - New Chief Executive Officer

 

"New Chief Executive Officer"

Kirkland, WA. (September 1, 2000) – The Software Revolution, Inc. (TSRI), a world-class provider of assessment, transformation, re-factoring and web-enablement software services for legacy systems, today announced that they welcome Stan Beckelman as Chief Executive Officer. This appointment reflects the growth in demand for TSRI’s software suite to minister legacy system upgrades.

Stan Beckelman as new Chief Executive Officer

Mr. Beckelman recently left Boeing where he was President of Boeing Information Services for six years. In this assignment he was responsible for capturing, and performing large complex information systems working for commercial customers and government agencies such as NASA, Department of Defense, and Department of Energy. Mr. Beckelman held several management and engineering positions over a forty-year period at Boeing. He had been responsible for Boeing Computer Services marketing and sales, including thirty sales offices across North America. Another earlier Boeing assignment was managing a staff of 3000 employees and several very large-scale computer centers serving Boeing Commercial Airplane Group and Boeing Defense and Space Group. Early in his Boeing career he earned distinction as Program Manager of the NASA Saturn V Systems Engineering and Integration effort during the Apollo space program where he managed a staff of 2000 assuring that the Saturn V rocket was capable of boosting the command module carrying NASA astronauts to the moon.

He also served as an international director of the Armed Forces Communications & Electronics Association (AFCEA) and as Boeing's representative on the National Security Telecommunications Advisory Committee responsible for developing information technology and telecommunication security recommendations for the President of the United States.

The Software Revolution, Inc.

The Software Revolution, Inc., established in 1995, specializes in the modernization of legacy system software. Employing state-of-the-art artificial intelligence-based technologies, The Software Revolution, Inc. has developed the capability to assess, transform, re-factor, and web-enable, a variety of different software source languages, along with system databases.

Employing a highly automated, low risk, cost-effective approach, The Software Revolution, Inc. can transform COBOL, C, Fortran, Mumps, Ada, and CMS2 into modern, platform-independent C++, JAVA, or XML with CORBA compatibility.

eVolution 2000™ toolset

The foundation of TSRI's capabilities is the eVolution 2000™ tool-set. Enjoying the benefit of over 100 man-years of development effort and nearly $20 million in corporate and private investment funding, the eVolution 2000™ tool-set addresses each of the major steps of the legacy system modernization process at near perfect levels of automation.

Beyond the ability to address the standard suite of legacy software languages, the eVolution 2000™ tool-set also has the flexibility to address most other legacy software languages, needing only 8 to 12 weeks of automated processes modification to accept the new source language.

Using the eVolution 2000™ tool-set, The Software Revolution, Inc. can help customers enter the modern computing world quickly and far less expensively than using currently available manual or semi-automated approaches.
For more information about TSRI, visit our web site or contact:

TSRI
Greg Tadlock
Vice President of Sales
Phone: (425) 284-2770
Fax:     (425) 284-2785
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Tuesday, 15 September 2009 13:54

2000 - New Senior Analyst

 

"New Senior Analyst"

Kirkland, WA. (May 15, 2000) – The Software Revolution, Inc. (TSRI), a world-class provider of assessment, transformation, re-factoring and web-enablement software services for legacy systems, today announced the appointment of Luong Nguyen as Senior Analyst. This appointment reflects the growth in demand for TSRI’s software suite to minister legacy system upgrades.

Luong Nguyen as new Senior Analyst

Luong Nguyen brings to TSRI more than four years of simulation software modeling experience, with a very strong background in C/C++, Fortran, Java, HTML, Unix, and ClearCase administration. Prior to TSRI, Mr. Nguyen was a Senior Specialist Engineer for the Joint Strike Fighter (JSF) Program at Boeing. While working on this project, Mr. Nguyen integrated a six degrees-of-freedom flying qualities simulation for the JSF, developed and maintained subsystems simulation software models using C and Fortran, and set up a ClearCase configuration-management environment for simulation development. Prior to the JSF Program, Mr. Nguyen was a Specialist Engineer for the Integrated Systems Lab at Boeing. Mr. Nguyen was responsible for the 777 Autopilot and Mode Control Panel simulation software models, correlate flight test data with simulation data for FAA certifications efforts, and test and debug autopilot control logic and subsystems interface.

With Luong Nguyen’s strong background in C/C++, Fortran, Java, HTML, and Unix coupled with simulation software modeling, TSRI is looking toward a significant growth of products and services sales.

The Software Revolution, Inc.

The Software Revolution, Inc., established in 1995, specializes in the modernization of legacy system software. Employing state-of-the-art artificial intelligence-based technologies, The Software Revolution, Inc. has developed the capability to assess, transform, re-factor, and web-enable, a variety of different software source languages, along with system databases.

Employing a highly automated, low risk, cost-effective approach, The Software Revolution, Inc. can transform COBOL, C, Fortran, Mumps, Ada, and CMS2 into modern, platform-independent C++, JAVA, or XML with CORBA compatibility.

eVolution 2000™ toolset

The foundation of TSRI's capabilities is the eVolution 2000™ tool-set. Enjoying the benefit of over 100 man-years of development effort and nearly $20 million in corporate and private investment funding, the eVolution 2000™ tool-set addresses each of the major steps of the legacy system modernization process at near perfect levels of automation.

Beyond the ability to address the standard suite of legacy software languages, the eVolution 2000™ tool-set also has the flexibility to address most other legacy software languages, needing only 8 to 12 weeks of automated processes modification to accept the new source language.

Using the eVolution 2000™ tool-set, The Software Revolution, Inc. can help customers enter the modern computing world quickly and far less expensively than using currently available manual or semi-automated approaches.
For more information about TSRI, visit our web site or contact:

TSRI
Greg Tadlock
Vice President of Sales
Phone: (425) 284-2770
Fax:     (425) 284-2785
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
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